Baby Flu Shot

We now have baby flu shot for children ages 6- 35months.  Please log in to your child’s patient portal account or call our office to schedule an appointment during one of the following flu clinics, you may also walk in and receive your flu vaccine during any of these clinic times:

  • Wednesday, 11/5 Durham: 4-6pm

  • Saturday, 11/8 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

  • Saturday, 11/15 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

  • Saturday, 11/22 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

At this time we can now administer booster flu shots for all patients who have received the flu shot for the first time this flu season or for any patients that received the flu shot for the first time last season and only received 1 dose.

Please note we offer walk ins for flu vaccines Monday through Friday from 8:30am- 12pm and 1:30pm- 5pm in both office locations (first come, first serve).

We look forward to seeing you!

DUKE MEDICINE Flu Vaccine Study

Duke Medicine

Fever reducer and flu vaccine study

Children may be eligible to participate in a research study evaluating the effects of fever reducing medicines on fever and protection from the flu following the routine flu shot.

Qualifying participants receive:

  • Compensation for time and travel for completed visits

Your child may be eligible for this study if he/she:

  • Is healthy (may have a history of fever associated seizures)
  • 6 through 47 months of age
  • Receiving the flu shot

What is involved:

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol) medication or placebo or ibuprofen medication during the 24 hours after flu vaccine
  • Recording temperatures and symptoms the day of and the day following flu vaccine
  • 2 study visits with blood draws and one phone call visit

NOTE: The nasal flu vaccine is now the preferred flu vaccine for healthy children 2-8 years of age.

For more information please call:

919-620-5355

NCDHHS Ebola Information

About Ebola Virus Disease

Ebola, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare and deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains.  Ebola can cause disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).

Ebola is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/virus-families/filoviridae.html), genus Ebolavirus.  There are five identified Ebola virus species, four of which are known to cause disease in humans: Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus); Sudan virus (Sudan ebolavirus); Tai Forest virus (Tai Forest ebolavirus, formerly Cote d’lvoire ebolavirus); and Bundibugyo virus (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). The fifth, Reston virus (Reston ebolavirus), has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.

Ebola viruses are found in several African countries. Ebola was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically in Africa.

The natural reservoir host of Ebola virus remains unknown.  However, on the basis of evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is animal-borne and that bats are the most likely reservoir.  Four of the five virus strains occur in an animal host native to Africa.

Source: CDC.gov

 

Information for the Public

An Ebola public information line has been established by Carolinas Poison Control.  The number is 1-800-222-1222, and callers should press 6 for questions about Ebola.

Ebola is only contagious after the onset of symptoms.  The incubation period before symptoms may appear is 2-21 days, with 8-10 days being the most common.  Ebola is spread through unprotected contact with blood or body fluids from someone who is infected.  Anyone who becomes ill within 21 days after traveling to an affected area in West Africa should contact a healthcare provider right away and limit their contact with others until they have been evaluated.

Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or through your eyes, nose or mouth) with

  • Blood and body fluids (like urine, feces, saliva, vomit, sweat and semen) or a person who is sick with Ebola.
  • Objects (like needles) that have been contaminated with the blood or body fluids of a person sick with Ebola.

Ebola is not spread through the air, water or food.

There is no FDA-approved vaccine available for Ebola.  Experimental vaccines and treatments for Ebola are under development, but they have not yet been fully tested for safety or effectiveness.

Symptoms of Ebola

  • Fever greater than 101.5F (38.6C)
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Unexplained bleeding or bruising

To protect yourself from Ebola

  • DO wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Do NOT touch the blood or body fluids (like urine, feces, saliva, vomit, sweat, and semen) of people who are sick.
  • Do NOT handle items that may have come in contact with a sick person’s blood or body fluids, like clothes, bedding, needles or medical equipment.
  • Do NOT touch the body of someone who has died of Ebola.

CDC: Facts about Ebola (PDF, 217KB) (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/facts-about-ebola.pdf)

CDC: What You Need to Know about Ebola (PDF, 203MB)(http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/what-need-to-know-ebola.pdf)

CDC: Facts about Ebola in the US (PDF, 250KB)(http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/infographic.pdf)

CDC: Stopping the Ebola Outbreak (PDF, 140KB)(http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/ghs-ebola-materials.pdf target=)

Teenage Contraception

Teenage contraception:  The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement this month that female teenagers requesting contraception should first be recommended a Long Acting Reversible Contraceptive (LARC).  Current LARC’s include intra-uterine devices (IUD’s) that once inserted are effective for 3 to 10 years depending on the product and progestin implants that are inserted into the skin of the upper arm that last for 3 years.  One of the reasons behind this recommendation is that oral contraceptives have a “real life” failure rate of about 10%.

Flu Vaccine Update

Update on Flu Vaccine

Regarding flu vaccine delays: We are sorry about any inconveniences the national flu vaccine delays may have caused your family. Last year’s flu vaccine distribution was particularly quick and efficient. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have both issued statements saying that most manufacturers anticipate the majority of their flu vaccine distribution will occur by the end of October, which is consistent with most of the previous seasons. So, stay-tuned and thank you for your patience!

Currently in stock we have flu mist for patient’s ages 2 and up who are generally healthy and preservative free flu shot for patient’s ages 3 and up. Due to manufacturing issues, our supplier has not provided us with baby flu shot for children ages 6- 35months. The AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) and the CDC (Center for Disease Control) both recommend flu mist for children ages 2-8 years of age as they feel healthy children in this age group get better immunity from the live virus. It is also recommended that you get your flu vaccine early because it takes 2 weeks for it to be effective. We offer walk ins for flu vaccines Monday through Friday from 8:30am- 12pm and 1:30pm- 5pm in both office locations (first come, first serve). Please log in to your child’s patient portal account or call our office to schedule an appointment during one of the following flu clinics, you may also walk in and receive your flu vaccine during any of these clinic times

  • Saturday, 10/25 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

  • Wednesday, 11/5 Durham: 4-6pm

  • Saturday, 11/8 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

  • Saturday, 11/15 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

  • Saturday, 11/22 Chapel Hill: 9-2pm

Please stay tuned for further updates and more clinics. We look forward to seeing you!!